Download The Participatory Cultures Handbook by Aaron Delwiche PDF

By Aaron Delwiche

How did we get from Hollywood to YouTube? What makes Wikipedia so various from a conventional encyclopedia? Has blogging dismantled journalism as we all know it?

Our media panorama has passed through a seismic shift as electronic know-how has fostered the increase of "participatory culture," during which wisdom is originated, created, allotted, and evaluated in significantly new methods. The Participatory Cultures Handbook is an crucial, interdisciplinary guide to this quickly altering terrain. With brief, available essays from top geographers, political scientists, conversation theorists, video game designers, activists, coverage makers, physicists, and poets, this volume will introduce scholars to the idea that of participatory tradition, clarify how researchers process participatory tradition experiences, and supply unique examples of participatory tradition in motion. themes comprise crowdsourcing, obstacle mapping, grid computing, electronic activism in authoritarian nations, collaborative poetry, collective intelligence, participatory budgeting, and the connection among games and civic engagement.

Contributors contain: Daren Brabham, Helen Burgess, Clay Calvert, Mia Consalvo, Kelly Czarnecki, David M. Faris, Dieter Fuchs, Owen Gallagher, Clive Goodinson, Alexander Halvais, Cynthia Hawkins, John Heaven, The Jannissary Collective, Henry Jenkins, Barry Joseph, Christopher Kelty, Pierre Lévy, Sophia B. Liu, Rolf Luehrs, Patrick Meier, Jason Mittell, Sarah Pearce, W. James Potter, Howard Rheingold, Suzanne Scott, Benjamin Stokes, Thomas Swiss, Paul Taylor, Will Venters, Jen Ziemke

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The Participatory Cultures Handbook

How did we get from Hollywood to YouTube? What makes Wikipedia so diverse from a standard encyclopedia? Has blogging dismantled journalism as we all know it? Our media panorama has gone through a seismic shift as electronic know-how has fostered the increase of "participatory culture," during which wisdom is originated, created, dispensed, and evaluated in greatly new methods.

Extra info for The Participatory Cultures Handbook

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These signifiers transcend left-wing/right-wing binaries. The underlying message, the immutable truth, is brutal. These are pictures of naked violence; taken together, they constitute a tapestry of repression. This is where the story takes an interesting turn. Confronted with increasingly intense repression by the state, a fragmented student movement lost its grip on the substantive and procedural aims that defined its early existence. If the state would not respond to demands of its citizens, a different strategy was needed.

We would make what was irrelevant relevant. What was outrageous, commonplace. Like freaked-out Wobblies, we would build a new culture smack-dab in the burned out shell of the old dinosaur. (p. 86) And so he did. Declaring that it was time to transform “improper control of communication in this country,” Hoffman and Al Bell launched a newspaper called Youth International Party Line (YIPL) in 1971. In the first issue, Hoffman (1971a) made it very clear that this was a conscious political tactic. “We did not turn our backs on the movement for change,” he announced.

If one were to agree with this philosophical approach—if pitched battles in the streets would determine the ultimate victors of the long 1960s—the established order would seem destined for victory. After all, the state had a near monopoly on guns, tanks, bombs, prisons, and other tools of physical violence. Law and order candidates such as Ronald Reagan used The New Left and the Computer Underground 15 political unrest as a springboard to national power, and it seemed that the movement had truly lost.

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